India’s Zorawar Singh AKA Zoro Becomes Pride In Pro Wrestling

Zoro is simply electrifying. His build is 88kg and stands 6’2 feet. He made his pro wrestling debut in 2015 where he wrestled for Wrestle Square promotion in India where he uses his slender physique to his advantage in the ring and calls his finisher ‘Zoro Shock’.

He won the first-ever Wrestle Square Tag Team Championship and went on to win Cruiserweight Championship. He then went out to various wrestling promotions in Asia.

He emphases on the fact that he has trained himself with his training partner Baliyan Akki where they use to enact wrestling tapes from UK and Japan.

Follow Zorro on social media: Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Below is the interview:

Q. Currently which promotion are you wrestling for?

I currently wrestler for Wrestle Square in India.

Q. One of my questions was going to ask if you watched wrestling as a kid and what was your first wrestling memory?

I remember watching Armageddon 2000’s Hell in a Cell match in a video game parlour. They were fighting all over the ring, going up the cell, fighting on the cell, getting thrown off it, slamming each other on cars and whatnot. Rewatching that match now just won’t capture that magic when I first saw it. I can’t forget that moment. Pro wrestling hooked me in for life at that very moment.

Q. Who trained you?

It was Baliyan Akki and me, we had a ring and lots of time to try out all the stuff we watched from the UK’s world of sports to Japanese Joshi Puroresu. We studied and tried everything. It was a trial and error method of learning the wrestling business. Then we went all around India and overseas and attended seminars and met people with experience in the business to check our abilities at the world level. WWE tryout was the culmination of that process when both of us went up against the best of the country and stood up among all because we learned our own way.

Q. On a scale of 1 to 10 how hard the wrestling mat is, and then how hard are the ropes when you are running off them?

A hard 10 on a bad day. We practice every day to make the pain tolerable but now and then someone will fall a little awkwardly and get the wind knocked out of them. The wrestling mat can be deceiving and I’ve seen kids who thought it to be playground getting their ribs broken. I still avoid getting slammed face-first on the mat during the practice sessions. Same with the ropes as well, you’ll see imprints of the rope on your back. You try to save your back and run sideways and now your ribs hurt. The pain is inescapable oftentimes.

Q. How is it wrestling for a smaller crowd than an average wrestling event?

Having wrestled in front of crowds ranging from a dozen to a few thousand you get to experience how it impacts your game plan. I tend to go extra hard when there are fewer people around while a large crowd often tempts you to go off the strategy. You may start to do crowd-pleasing stuff which may result in your opponent taking advantage.

Q. Have you ever travelled to other countries to wrestle?

Wrestle Square has held a few shows in Thailand where I have performed. We collaborated with KWF and Gatoh Move for these events. Plus I am extremely proud to wrestle in Sawasdee Cup 2018 organized by Michinoku Pro Wrestling where I got to meet legends like Jinsei Shinzaki, Dick Togo, Emi Sakura, Riho among many others.

Q. Where’s the weirdest place or what’s the strangest events you have wrestled at?

One of our earlier events was held in a beachside hotel in Thailand. A band was playing Hotel California in the background. The ring was almost as stiff as concrete but everyone was pumped as many were making their professional debuts. Each fall felt like your lungs might collapse but still, we put on a memorable hard-hitting show there.

Q. Do you want to wrestle on a big show like Wrestlemania? Is that something you can imagine or is that not where you want to go with your career aspirations?

I think everyone should be ambitious and have the ultimate goal of winning the world championship at Wrestlemania. Even though the chances of that happening might be very slim similar to winning a million-dollar jackpot. I personally have a goal to perform at a big stage show whether it is in the US, Japan or Mexico.

Q. What’re your favourite matches of all times, if you could pick one or two?

My few favourites are Hardy Boyz vs Dudley Boyz vs Edge and Christian TLC SummerSlam 2000, Hardy Boyz vs Dudley Boyz Tables Match Royal Rumble 2000 and Hardy Boyz vs Edge and Christian Ladder Match No Mercy 1999. I have probably watched each of these matches a couple of dozen times at least.

Q. What your finisher?

A stout jawbreaker called Lightning Splitter and Swanton Bomb.

Q. To wrap things up is there anything that you would want to say to your fans, or anyone thinking about becoming a wrestler?

Patience and keeping your ego in check are the two things that people struggle with, in the early stages of the wrestling business. Getting to that stage that you dream of takes years and years of practice and grind. You can’t become Kenny Omega in a year. I struggled with dropkicks and probably took 6 to 8 months to learn it. I have seen countless guys who quit in the first week, giving up their dream due to this impatience.

Another thing is everyone wants to be the top guy. I know that should be the goal but that if it converts into entitlement, it can be very detrimental. People become bitter and it affects their performance. You just have to wait for your time, or better yet make the best out of the time, however small, that is given to you.

Find your niche. If you can’t be the best in the ring maybe you will be better on the mic. Maybe you make people laugh or grab their attention with your unique style of wrestling. Joey Ryan, Santino Marella, The Miz, Mick Foley are just a few examples of people who were never seen as the traditional musclehead pro-wrestler archetype but still managed to make a huge impact in Pro Wrestling with their own unique set of talents.

3 thoughts on “India’s Zorawar Singh AKA Zoro Becomes Pride In Pro Wrestling

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Next Post

Singapore's Destroyer Dharma talks about being Mr Singapore and his career as a Pro Wrestler

Danie Dharma is 33years old. He is primarily a competitive bodybuilder. He initially took up bodybuilding as he used to be a short and skinny kid, at that time he was around 5ft 2, just slightly over 100lbs and was bullied, beaten and rejected throughout his high school days. He […]
Call Now Button